Case Study

Pace

Pace received support to help children with motor disorders to access integrated assessment and therapy based early interventions

We are at the stage now where we are both delivering the services for the children and families who need them, and being listened to at government level about the value of early intervention for these children more widely, which is very exciting.” – Staff member, Pace

The greatest impact on developing improved motor function and life potential can be achieved in the early years, when the brain is still developing.  With support of The Rothschild Foundation Pace is addressing the need for early intervention through PIPS (Pace Infant & Parent Service for babies and young children).

PIPS enables children with motor disorders to access integrated assessment and therapy based early interventions.  Each individual child is assessed and provided with their own bespoke programme of support which meets their unique needs. In the first six months of implementing the programme, PIPS is already supporting thirty five children from across Buckinghamshire as well as enabling their families to access a support network that will provide help, advice and counselling at a critical and emotionally challenging stage in their child’s development.

With support of The Rothschild Foundation Pace is addressing the need for early intervention

We really enjoy coming to Pace. Since 1 year old Cerys has attended weekly therapy sessions with Szilvia (one of the PIPS team) and really loves it. For her it’s a fun play session intermixed with song and massage, with her friend Szilvia! We have seen her making amazing developmental steps which speak for themselves and are a great example for the importance of continuity and early therapy intervention for children with brain damage. Cerys was deemed not to be able to do anything with her body after she sustained her birth injury, and today she is sitting cross-legged on the floor all by herself. Having one therapist working with our child on an ongoing basis without the need for endless assessments and “get-to-know” conversations is priceless and concentrates on the reason why we all meet: giving therapeutic input and guidance in order to reach the next goal.”– Julia Geis-Clements, Cerys’ mum

The transdisciplinary therapeutic input children receive in PIPS, where everything is under one roof, means that children are already demonstrating improved mobility, communication, self-care and eating and drinking.  Parents and Carers are part of sessions, supporting them to learn how to care and play with their child as well as offering specific training such as how to use assistive communication tools.

Funding has also enabled Pace to develop organisationally, building its profile and reputation within the disability sector. This includes contributing (through Action Cerebral Palsy) to the NICE guidelines ‘Managing Cerebral Palsy in under 25s’ and assisting New Philanthropy Capital research in making the case for the long term socio-economic value of investing in disabled children.

Young child talking with caregivers
Young child playing with white paint